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Poqet PC Mailing List Digest
Volume 001, Number 051, 7 Jan 1997

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  1. Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by David Deckert <jeeves@xxxxxxxx>
  2. Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by K. Peterson <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>
  3. Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by K. Peterson <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>

Digest Articles

Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by David Deckert <jeeves@xxxxxxxx>


From: David Deckert <jeeves@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge"
Date: Mon, 6 Jan 1997 22:47:04 -0500 (EST)
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
In-Reply-To: <199701031823.KAA28952@xxxxxxxx>

On Fri, 3 Jan 1997, Bryan Mason wrote:

> The spring that rubs against the hinge to keep the display open doesn't put
> that much pressure on the hinge.  It's mostly a friction thing.

I would tend to disagree. For one everyone describes the crack as
appearing on the right side (where the spring is) and the fact that I
stuck a little screw driver in there once and tried to push down on the
thing. It's pretty strong little thing.

> Actually, it is true that the electrical engineers who did the Poqet were
> top-notch, but the mechanical designers left alot to be desired.  

Yep. Although other than the hinge problem it is mechanically pretty 
sound I think. Fragile though. I think I agree with the other poster than 
I'm going to have to go get a HP. I joined this list in the hopes that 
someone had the same problem and came up with a way to fix it. I guess 
the thing will continue to spend time in the room generally referred to 
as the computer museum. Kind of miss it though. ;)

+----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
 When you say "I wrote a program that crashed Windows", people just stare at
 you blankly and say "Hey, I got those with the system, *for free*"
 	--Linus Torvalds 

+--- jeeves@xxxxxxxx ----------------------------- finger for public key ---+




Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by K. Peterson <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>


From: "K. Peterson" <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge"
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 00:00:50 -0800 (PST)
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
In-Reply-To: <199701070348.TAA22198@xxxxxxxx>

I'm fascinated by the conversation regarding broken hinges.  We have two
poqets in our family, both still with good hinges, but I'm about to pursue
a "keep healthy project" for them.  I guess the consensus is that
replacing the rollpin and keep-cover-open friction spring with less
stressful components should eliminate the fatigue cracking.  I think that
a dental bit (in a Dremel tool or dental handpiece) should be able to
drill a tiny hole in the side of the pin so a tiny hook could pull the pin 
out. Failing this, a groove 2 mm long in the plastic surrounding the outer
end of the pin should let me get a good grip on the pin with jeweler's
pliers, one jaw inside the pin, one outside.  Then just replace the pin
with a looser fitting brass or steel pin.  Hold the pin in with a small
plate over the outer end, or note this: Just a dab of hot-melt glue.
There are two common glues, one is nearly transparent and very flexible,
the other is opaque white and hardens more.  As for the keep-open spring,
has anybody found a preferred way to hold the door open without that
spring? I know there are many options like external clips or that flat
wooden board, etc, etc.

Now, for the broken ones.  I have used that opaque hot-melt glue
extensively in place of potted shell coverings for electronic components.
It is quite rigid, fairly strong, and sticks to almost everything.  I have
used it many places where flexibility prevented epoxy from bonding.  I
often make special line cord plugs from it in place of the common molded 
rubber.  If my hinge were broken, I would try to build up a new section,
probably a little thicker (and uglier) than the factory one, using the
opaque stuff, molding it a little with wet fingertips, and using sandpaper
or a sharp knife for final shaping.  Sorry if this is too many words.
Ken Peterson.



Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge" by K. Peterson <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>


From: "K. Peterson" <kpeters@xxxxxxxx>
Subject: Re: "Death of a Poqet" or "Everything Hinges on a Hinge"
Date: Tue, 7 Jan 1997 00:52:29 -0800 (PST)
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII
In-Reply-To: <199701070348.TAA22198@xxxxxxxx>

OOPS! In my enthusiasm for the hot-melt glue, I forgot that there is also
an opaque hot-melt product that is nothing more than caulking.  Don't use
that.  I haven't seen the good tough stuff recently in my hardware store,
but then I haven't been seriously looking for it either.  Regarding
whether it is the pin or the spring causing the cracks: Their sress is
probably additive-I'm goint to try to replace both.
Ken Peterson




Filename: PoqetPC/mailing-list/cgi/show-digest.htmt
Date Created: 30 Nov 1996, Last Modified: 13 May 2009
Created by Bryan Mason - E-Mail: poqetpc<at>bmason<dot>com